Can Dogs Eat Mushrooms?

Mushrooms are both delicious and nutritious. The popular edible mushrooms are a good source of iron, potassium, magnesium, vitamin B6, and many other valuable nutrients. Obviously dogs should stay clear of known toxic mushrooms, but can they eat the mushrooms we enjoy? Can dogs eat edible mushrooms? The short answer would be yes, in small amounts, dogs can eat edible mushrooms, but you have to be extremely cautious.

Dogs Can Only Eat Mushrooms in Low Amounts

While dogs can eat edible mushrooms like the champignons on the picture, it could still be dangerous for your dog to eat a good amount mushrooms.
While dogs can eat edible mushrooms like the champignons on the picture, it could still be dangerous for your dog to eat a good amount mushrooms.

While the mushrooms that aren’t toxic for us, aren’t toxic for our canine friends as well, a large amount of edible mushrooms can still be dangerous for dogs. As dogs are not used to eating mushrooms, you shouldn’t give your dog more than a few mushrooms at a time. Should your dog eat a good amount of mushrooms at once, it would most likely cause gastrointestinal distress, tummy ache, and result in vomiting, diarrhea, or something far worse.

I’ve actually read about a dog who died after eating a good amount of morels, edible non-toxic mushrooms, at once. So, if you want to share mushrooms with your dog, keep in mind that she cannot have more than 1 or 2 mushrooms in one meal.

If you do decide to give your dog a few mushrooms, make sure that they aren’t cooked with a lot of salt as salt is toxic to dogs. Leave out the garlic too.

Watch Out for Toxic Mushrooms

Fly agaric —  one of the over 1400 types of poisonous mushrooms.
Fly agaric — one of the over 1400 types of poisonous mushrooms.

If you buy champignons or another popular edible mushrooms from the supermarket, you can be sure that they aren’t toxic to you or your dog, but if you go hunting for mushrooms yourself, make sure you do not bring home anything poisonous. Keep careful watch over your dog as well to make sure she doesn’t snitch a mushroom when you aren’t looking.

Also, as mushrooms are very likely to pop up in parks and even in your back yard as well, it is important to make sure your dog doesn’t accidentally eat a poisonous mushroom. If you take your dog to play in a park, don’t let her out of your sight, and make sure she doesn’t eat anything except maybe for the dog treats you brought with you from the home. Also, keep your back yard mushroom-free. If you see any mushrooms growing in your garden, simply throw them away.

What if Your Dog Already Ate a Poisonous Mushroom?

If you suspect that your dog might have eaten a poisonous mushroom, it is important to take action right away. There are more than 1400 different types of poisonous mushrooms, which means the symptoms vary widely. However, the most common symptoms of mushroom poisoning in dogs are abdominal pain, diarrhea, vomiting, weakness, lethargy, yellowing of the skin, uncoordinated movements, excessive drooling, seizures, and coma. If you notice any of these symptoms, it would be best to get your dog to a veterinarian’s office as soon as possible. If you are not sure whether your dog ate a poisonous mushroom or not, and she doesn’t (yet) show any of the above symptoms, it might be a good idea to get your dog checked out by a veterinarian anyway. Depending on what type of mushroom your dog ate, she might not show symptoms of mushroom poisoning for up to 12 hours, and then it might already be too late.

Conclusion

While dogs can eat cooked non-toxic mushrooms, you should not give your dog more than 1-2 mushrooms at once. Also, make sure there are no poisonous mushrooms growing in your back yard, and when you take your dog to the park, make sure she doesn’t eat anything expect for the dog treats you brought with you.

If you enjoyed this post, please consider leaving a comment or subscribing to the RSS feed to have future articles delivered to your feed reader.

Article written by

Please comment with your real name using good manners.

Leave a Reply